Grammatical Information in Dictionaries: How Categorical should it Be?

Page507-511
AuthorColin Yallop
TitleGrammatical Information in Dictionaries: How Categorical should it Be?
AbstractDictionaries vary in their presentation of grammatical information but agree in assigning words to discrete grammatical categories, or at least in implying such assignment. But linguists like Halliday and Sinclair have argued that grammar is probabilistic rather than categorical. Corpus evidence shows that it is indeed more realistic to describe typical patterns than to insist on categorisation. Carefully chosen examples can signal typical usage without the need for rigid categorisation.
SessionPART 3 - The Dictionary-making Process
Keywords
BibTex
@InProceedings{ELX96_2-015,
author = {Colin Yallop},
title = {Grammatical Information in Dictionaries: How Categorical should it Be?},
pages = {507-511},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the 7th EURALEX International Congress},
year = {1996},
month = {aug},
date = {13-18},
address = {Göteborg, Sweden},
editor = {Martin Gellerstam, Jerker Järborg, Sven-Göran Malmgren, Kerstin Norén, Lena Rogström, Catalina Röjder Papmehl},
publisher = {Novum Grafiska AB},
isbn = {91-87850-14-1},
}
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