More than one Way to Skin a Cat: Why Full-Sentence Definitions Have not Been Universally Adopted

By November 17, 2016,
Page323-337
AuthorMichael Rundell
TitleMore than one Way to Skin a Cat: Why Full-Sentence Definitions Have not Been Universally Adopted
AbstractAt the last Euralex Congress, John Sinclair reiterated the case for full-sentence definitions (FSDs), and questioned why the COBUlLD approach to defining had not been generally adopted by other dictionary publishers. This paper answers his question. The theoretical case for FSDs is reviewed (and in general not challenged), and it is shown how the full-sentence model of ten results in definitions that are more effective and more readable than could be achieved using traditional styles. But the FSD is not always the most appropriate strategy: the approach has several disadvantages, and a rigid adherence to this style does not always serve best interests of dictionary users (especially language learners). Rather, it will be argued, the goals that gave rise to the FSD may often be achieved through other means. The paper concludes with proposals for a range of defining strategies (including FSDs), along with suggestions as to when each is likely to be most effective.
Session4. THE DICTIONARY-MAKING PROCESS
Keywords
BibTex
@InProceedings{ELX06-040,
author = {Michael Rundell},
title = {More than one Way to Skin a Cat: Why Full-Sentence Definitions Have not Been Universally Adopted },
pages = {323-337},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the 12th EURALEX International Congress},
year = {2006},
month = {sep},
date = {6-9},
address = {Torino, Italy},
editor = {Elisa Corino, Carla Marello, Cristina Onesti},
publisher = {Edizioni dell'Orso},
isbn = {88-7694-918-6},
}
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